Literary festival brings books and poetry to favelas of Rio de Janeiro_World_Asia Pacific Daily

To download APD News app

1. Please scan the QR Code 2. Download and install APD News App

Literary festival brings books and poetry to favelas of Rio de Janeiro

World2017-11-15

The past week has seen a literary festival take place in one of the poorest neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Violence is rising in the area, but that hasn't stopped organizers from bringing books to those who need an escape. The Vidigal favela offers one of the most stunning views of Rio de Janeiro. It was also the site of this year's literary festival for residents who live in marginalized areas. Contemporary writers from around the world were invited to perform, and a variety of other activities promoted reading. One of the highlights was the poetry contest, where people from all over the world performed their work. "When we first started this new movement of poetry, it was to take it away from the idea of these old dead European white men and realize that poetry was alive and in the streets," American slam poet and actor Saul Williams said. "And if you look at this, that's what you see." It is an important initiative in a country where reading is not a popular pastime. The UN said 13 million people in Brazil still can't read or write, and according to government studies, 44 percent of Brazilians never read and nearly one-third have never bought a book. That's why book donations are a big part of the event, and are especially welcomed by favela children. "It is the first event like this in the neighborhood with all these free books, and I think it is so important because it motivates people to read," one student said. The average Brazilian reads fewer than five books a year, making the task of bringing literature and creative writing to Rio’s favelas difficult. But organizers said the festival is having an impact. Not only does the project expose residents to literature, but it also encourages them to create works of their own. "So far we've published the works of more than 200 writers from the fringe areas of Rio, and one book is being turned into a movie," festival organizer Ecio Salles said. (CGTN)

The past week has seen a literary festival take place in one of the poorest neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Violence is rising in the area, but that hasn't stopped organizers from bringing books to those who need an escape.

The Vidigal favela offers one of the most stunning views of Rio de Janeiro. It was also the site of this year's literary festival for residents who live in marginalized areas.

Contemporary writers from around the world were invited to perform, and a variety of other activities promoted reading.

One of the highlights was the poetry contest, where people from all over the world performed their work.

"When we first started this new movement of poetry, it was to take it away from the idea of these old dead European white men and realize that poetry was alive and in the streets," American slam poet and actor Saul Williams said. "And if you look at this, that's what you see."

It is an important initiative in a country where reading is not a popular pastime. The UN said 13 million people in Brazil still can't read or write, and according to government studies, 44 percent of Brazilians never read and nearly one-third have never bought a book. That's why book donations are a big part of the event, and are especially welcomed by favela children.

"It is the first event like this in the neighborhood with all these free books, and I think it is so important because it motivates people to read," one student said.

The average Brazilian reads fewer than five books a year, making the task of bringing literature and creative writing to Rio’s favelas difficult. But organizers said the festival is having an impact.

Not only does the project expose residents to literature, but it also encourages them to create works of their own.

"So far we've published the works of more than 200 writers from the fringe areas of Rio, and one book is being turned into a movie," festival organizer Ecio Salles said.

(CGTN)

Hot Recommended

  • China: Grieving mother confronts murdered daughter's former roommate

  • China’s giant energy firm keen to expand cooperation with Indonesia

  • Indonesia frees hostages from separatist group’s custody in Papua

  • Pakistan:Honda criticized for blaming fuel quality for vehicle’s failure

  • EU silence over Catalan leader's call for action speaks volumes

  • China reaches agreement with WHO on fight against cancer