Spotlight: U.S. tariff consideration on China disapproved by public_Economy_Asia Pacific Daily

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Spotlight: U.S. tariff consideration on China disapproved by public

Economy2017-08-10

U.S. President Donald Trump's administration recently threatened to investigate China's intellectual property and trade policies, for it thinks the United States has been hurt by China in these fields. However, many Americans believe that talks work better than threats."Trump got many investigation going on for everything right now. China is a huge trade partner. China can't survive without us, and we can't survive without China. We need to face that fact," local resident known as Tracy told Xinhua in Los Angeles.The U.S. administration initially planned to announce on August 4 that it would have its Trade Representative's Office investigate under Section 301 of Trade Act of 1974. It has promised to bring deficits down by imposing tariffs and other non-tariff trade barriers whenever necessary.The U.S. government postponed the announcement due to comprehensive concerns, especially that the U.S. export might get hurt over a possible trade war with China."I think that would be a disaster for the economy for numerous reasons, so that would not be a good idea," said John, a local resident in Washington D.C."I don't think it is fair to start sanctioning China now. Where is this coming from? And why are we doing it? If it was fair then why none of our other presidents bothered to do it? " Takisha Walter told Xinhua in Chicago."Definitely not. Trade war is benefiting nobody. It's so much better if people can negotiate. Even if it's time consuming," said John.Tommy, another resident in Washington D.C., said that "I could understand it is used as a tool to pressure North Korea's nuclear program, but again, outside of that, it's tough to say, especially because of the huge volume of trade we do with China, it's just an economic weak point."A case in point is that about 60 percent of soybeans grown by American farmers are exported, with China by far the largest customer."As I said, negotiate. I'm really not familiar with any sanctions on China. I feel these things can be worked out overtime," added John."I think it's good to close the things, especially with China being a leader in exports and imports. So I think having a good relationship with China is better for the U.S.," added Tommy.Those interviewed by Xinhua all call for the U.S. to refrain from imposing tariffs or trade penalties, for there will be collateral damage in trade conflicts with China."They can talk about it. They can improve those things. China is so important today. If Chinese economy collapses, the whole world collapses. If the U.S. economy collapses, the whole world collapses. So those two are the biggest economic powers in the world. I believe now China is just on the same level economically like the U.S.," said Zorann who lives in L.A.A Chicago resident known as Charles told Xinhua that "China's relationship with the U.S. is a complicated one. I'm sure they will get over it. They will work things out. With all the debts we have to and from each other, it is just another bump on the road. They will get over it. They will figure something out."(With Hu Yousong and Guo Yina reporting in Washington D.C., Huang Chao in L.A., and Miao Zhuang in Chicago)

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U.S. President Donald Trump's administration recently threatened to investigate China's intellectual property and trade policies, for it thinks the United States has been hurt by China in these fields. However, many Americans believe that talks work better than threats.

"Trump got many investigation going on for everything right now. China is a huge trade partner. China can't survive without us, and we can't survive without China. We need to face that fact," local resident known as Tracy told Xinhua in Los Angeles.

The U.S. administration initially planned to announce on August 4 that it would have its Trade Representative's Office investigate under Section 301 of Trade Act of 1974. It has promised to bring deficits down by imposing tariffs and other non-tariff trade barriers whenever necessary.

The U.S. government postponed the announcement due to comprehensive concerns, especially that the U.S. export might get hurt over a possible trade war with China.

"I think that would be a disaster for the economy for numerous reasons, so that would not be a good idea," said John, a local resident in Washington D.C.

"I don't think it is fair to start sanctioning China now. Where is this coming from? And why are we doing it? If it was fair then why none of our other presidents bothered to do it? " Takisha Walter told Xinhua in Chicago.

"Definitely not. Trade war is benefiting nobody. It's so much better if people can negotiate. Even if it's time consuming," said John.

Tommy, another resident in Washington D.C., said that "I could understand it is used as a tool to pressure North Korea's nuclear program, but again, outside of that, it's tough to say, especially because of the huge volume of trade we do with China, it's just an economic weak point."

A case in point is that about 60 percent of soybeans grown by American farmers are exported, with China by far the largest customer.

"As I said, negotiate. I'm really not familiar with any sanctions on China. I feel these things can be worked out overtime," added John.

"I think it's good to close the things, especially with China being a leader in exports and imports. So I think having a good relationship with China is better for the U.S.," added Tommy.

Those interviewed by Xinhua all call for the U.S. to refrain from imposing tariffs or trade penalties, for there will be collateral damage in trade conflicts with China.

"They can talk about it. They can improve those things. China is so important today. If Chinese economy collapses, the whole world collapses. If the U.S. economy collapses, the whole world collapses. So those two are the biggest economic powers in the world. I believe now China is just on the same level economically like the U.S.," said Zorann who lives in L.A.

A Chicago resident known as Charles told Xinhua that "China's relationship with the U.S. is a complicated one. I'm sure they will get over it. They will work things out. With all the debts we have to and from each other, it is just another bump on the road. They will get over it. They will figure something out."

(With Hu Yousong and Guo Yina reporting in Washington D.C., Huang Chao in L.A., and Miao Zhuang in Chicago)

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